This is it. It's Election Day There are some things you need to know before you go to your designated polling place that you may not be aware of.

  • 1

    You Must Have A Photo ID

    (and you can get one for free!)

    You read that subtitle correctly. Your driver's license or state issued ID card is suitable. If you don't have one, visit the nearest Office of Motor Vehicles, present your voter registration card, and they will provide you with a FREE identification card you can use at the polls.

    Louisiana OMV
  • 2

    No "campaigning" within 600 feet of a polling place

    You can't wear hats, stickers, shirts, or any paraphernalia/clothing that promotes or advertises for a particular candidate or issue when you go to vote. It's illegal. You can and will be turned away. You can go back to vote after you've changed or are no longer displaying the item.

    Thinkstock Images, ThinkStock
  • 3

    You Have A Time Limit In The Booth

    According to the Secretary of State's website, if you don't need assistance with the ballot, you have three minutes to cast your vote. If you need assistance or require the use of the audio voting keypad, you must complete your ballot within 20 minutes. A reminder that there are several items that ALL Louisiana voters must decide upon, including senator and six constitutional amendments. For an easy-to-understand list of them, click here.

  • 4

    You Can Bring A List Of How You Plan To Vote

    Whether you use the Geaux Vote app on your smart phone, a paper ballot from your registrar's office, or the tried-and-true piece of paper from home, you are allowed to bring a "cheat sheet" with you into the voting booth. It's prudent to visit GeauxVote.com or the Geaux Vote app to find out what exactly is on YOUR ballot so you aren't caught off-guard.

  • 5

    Know When To Vote

    Polls open at 6AM and close at 8PM on Tuesday. If you get to your precinct by 8:00 and there is a line, the people working the election will either stand behind the person who is last in line at 8:00 or lock the doors signaling that time is up. The people who are working at election sites are trained to do their jobs, and they are officials, as such. There is a process should you have a grievance.