A digital piece of art just sold for a whopping $69M. Let that sink in, it is not even a physical piece of work it is a big jpg. Digital art goes back for decades but this is different in a few ways.

The artist's name is Beeple and it is titled “Everydays: The First 5000 Days”. It is a collection of photos that Beeple has posted online …for 5000 days.  His website is a hoot…he introduces himself by saying “BEEPLE is mike Winkelmann…he makes a variety of art crap across a variety of media. some of it is ok, but a lot of it kind of blows ass. he’s working on making it suck less everyday though so bear with him... :)”  I kinda like this guy.  You can get a feel for more of his work on his Instagram page, it is digital art and a bit edgy.

Everydays: The First 5000 Days” when you look at is like an image made of thousands of smaller images of his work.  While the images do not come together to make a bigger image there seems to be a color flow to the final image.

The art is also unique because it is an NFT or non-fungible tokens which type of cryptographic token that that means it is represents something unique.  If I understand this correctly, it allowed the artist to control the work and still have the copyright. So if you buy whatever the NFT represents you get the special code that lets only that person or persons access that thing.  Honestly, I only sort of getting it. But it sounds like to could be a good thing for artist of all types to control and be paid for their work. I find cryptocurrency, blockchain technology, and NFT fascinating.

The sale of “Everydays: The First 5000 Days” for $69M at Christie’s Auction House and was the first only-digital product they ever sold at Christie’s AND the first time the auction house was able to accept payment by a certain type of cryptocurrency. This sale also makes Beeple one of the “top three living artists according to Christie’s Twitter page.

Check it out for yourself on Christie’s Auction House website

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