Yea, he's still here. That was my first question when I read an article about this new trial.

A short recap on Kevin Daigle. Daigle shot and killed Louisiana State Trooper Steven Vincent during a stop in 2015 where Vincent found Daigle on the side of the road and was stopping to offer assistance to Daigle in Bell City. Daigle had just killed his remote before his interaction with Vincent as well. In 2019, Daigle was tried and found guilty by a jury after just under one hour of deliberation. The jury agreed that he should be executed.

attachment-Lafayette Parish Jail
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According to KPLC News, before the jury made their official decision there was concern that one of the jurors was actually able to fulfill their duty properly. After the verdict was decided by the jury in 2019, Daigle's defense attorney worked a deal with the state that the verdict would stand, but not the penalty. Therefore, the penalty would need to be re-decided by another jury.

Now, here is where we are. The jury for this particular phase has been selected for this penalty part of the trial. The jury has been collected from Baton Rouge and those jurors who were selected are being transported to Lake Charles today. The trial and opening statements will begin tomorrow, Saturday, morning in Lake Charles. This jury will be the final decision on the date of Kevin Daigle.

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